PlasticsEdge™ Lead Generation Program: Call 978-342-9000 for details or email [email protected]

Plastic-News-Recycling-Today-Worms-Can-Recycle-Plastics

As the damaging effects of plastic pollution continue to increase, it’s growing increasingly necessary to take aggressive action against them. Recycling is one of the more conventional approaches to tackling the plastic waste problem, but it may not be effective enough. Scientists looking for ways to fight the pollution problem are now finding that mealworms might be useful in the process.

According to a study in Environmental Science & Technology, mealworms are able to consume plastics and convert them into carbon dioxide, rather than passing the plastics in their feces, as The Economist reports. A bacteria found in the guts of mealworms can help quickly break down polymers, the study found. Other research has found that they are also able to digest a plastic called polystyrene.

The research is especially important now, as plastics have growing, negative impacts on the environment as well as human health. Jenna Jambeck, an environmental engineer who conducted a 2015 study on the topic found that nearly 19 billion pounds of plastic ends up in the ocean each year, and the number is expected to double by 2025. Plastic poses a threat to entire ecosystems, killing more animals, and puts human health at risk as microplastics make their way into the food chain.

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

The Real Price of Packaging

How much would it cost to switch to plastic alternatives? Richard...

Plastic packaging industry experiencing solid M&A activity

Merger and acquisition activity in the plastics industry and, in...

The world of plastics, in numbers

From its early beginnings during and after World War II, the...

From slag to swag: The story of Earl Tupper’s fantastic plastics

When “American Horror Story,” the Museum of Modern Art and “Napoleon...

Where are the current plastics exports markets?

To keep up with the top export destinations for U.S.-sourced scrap...

Not The Balloons! Balloons may be drifting down straws’ path

NEW YORK — Now that plastic straws may be headed for extinction,...

How robots are revolutionizing medical device manufacturing

Reece Armstrong looks at how medical manufacturing has reacted to...

Ketchup from These Packets is on a Slippery Slope

A new method for making food packaging more “slippery” could help...

The Future is Plastics at Duke Chemistry

The future is indeed plastics. Duke chemistry professor Stephen...

Polymer 3D printing will be $16-billion industry by 2027

Increasing industrialization efforts across various plastic printing...